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PAOLO VERONESE


Palazzo della Gran Guardia

from 5 July to 5 October 2014




 


Paolo Caliari, called the Veronese,  returns to his native Verona, with an exhibition that comes directly from the National Gallery in London: an exposition of paintings from the most important museums of Europe, which will arrive at the Gran Guardia in Verona July 5, 2014 to animate the cultural environment of the city until October 5, 2014.
 The core of the exhibition, alongside with some paintings of the famous Renaissance painter, will be the section devoted to the drawings such as “The dinner in the house of Simon the Pharisee”, which will be restored for the big occasion.

Paolo Veronese, byname of Paolo Caliari    (born 1528, Verona, Republic of Venice [Italy]—died April 9, 1588, Venice), one of the major painters of the 16th-century Venetian school. His works usually are huge, vastly peopled canvases depicting allegorical, biblical, or historical subjects in splendid colour and set in a framework of classicizing Renaissance architecture. A master of the use of colour, he also excelled at illusionary compositions that extend the eye beyond the actual confines of the room.

For more information visit the official websites www.mostraveronese.com and www.discorveronese.com.

The early years

Caliari became known as Veronese after his birthplace. Though first apprenticed as a stonecutter, his father’s trade, he showed such a marked interest in painting that in his 14th year he was apprenticed to a painter named Antonio Badile, whose daughter Elena he later married. From Badile Veronese derived a sound basic painting technique as well as a passion for paintings in which people and architecture were integrated. The style of his first known work, the Bevilacqua-Lazise Altarpiece, reflects Badile’s influence. Veronese was also influenced by a group of painters that included Domenico Brusasorci, Giambattista Zelotti, and Paolo Farinati; attracted by Mannerist art, they studied the works of Giulio Romano, Raphael, Parmigianino, and Michelangelo. Fragments of a fresco decoration executed by Veronese in 1551 for the Villa Soranza in Treville, with their elegant decorative figures, suggest that he was already creating a new idiom. The influence of Michelangelo is evident in a splendid canvas, Temptation of St. Anthony, painted in 1552 for the cathedral of Mantua.
In 1553 Veronese was introduced to Venice and launched on a long collaboration with the Venetian authorities in connection with the decoration of different parts of the Palazzo Ducale. The first of these commissions, the partitioned ceiling of the Sala del Consiglio dei Dieci (Hall of the Council of Ten), reveals characteristics of Veronese’s mature style: skillful foreshortenings that make figures appear to be actually floating in space above the viewer, chromatic splendour, and luminous passages that endow even the shadows with colour.
In 1555, probably at the summons of the prior of S. Sebastiano in Venice, Veronese began the decoration of the church that was later to become his burial place. Whereas in the Palazzo Ducale he had often worked in collaboration with Zelotti, Veronese worked alone in S. Sebastiano. In the Story of Esther, depicted on the ceiling, appear the first of his rigorous compositions of foreshortened groups in luminous architectural frameworks and his decorative fancies that juxtapose animated, almost stereometric foregrounds and background figures wrought with a few strokes of light. The skilled fresco painter, who had worked in the villas and palaces of Venetian noblemen, including the beautiful boudoir of the Trevisan family in Murano, recounted the stories of St. Sebastian in elegantly fluent frescoes painted for the church (1558). In his decoration of the two shutters of the organ (1559), he again revealed his mastery of rhythmic composition and illusionistic perspective through extreme foreshortening. Contemporaneously with the decoration of S. Sebastiano, Veronese received numerous commissions for altarpieces, devotional paintings, and some Last Suppers. The theme of the latter—depicted in such paintings as The Pilgrims of Emmaus and Feast in the House of Levi—allowed him to compose large groups of figures in increasingly complex Renaissance architectural settings that attest to his knowledge of the works of the 16th-century Venetian architects Michele Sanmicheli, Andrea Palladio, and Jacopo Sansovino.


 

Pictures